ALA Announces 2017 Award Winners

On Wednesday, January 25th, the American Library Association announced its 2017 Youth Media Award Winners:

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:

“The Girl Who Drank the Moon,” written by Kelly Barnhill, is the 2017 Newbery Medal winner. The book is published by Algonquin Young Readers, an imprint of Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, a division of Workman Publishing.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:

“Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat,” illustrated by Javaka Steptoe is the 2017 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Javaka Steptoe and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African-American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

“March: Book Three,” written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, is the King Author Book winner. The book is illustrated by Nate Powell and published by Top Shelf Productions, an imprint of IDW Publishing, a division of Idea and Design Works LLC.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

“Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat,” illustrated by Javaka Steptoe, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book is written by Javaka Steptoe and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:

“March: Book Three,” created by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell, is the 2017 Printz Award winner. The book is published by Top Shelf Productions, an imprint of IDW Publishing.

For full details go to:

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2017/01/american-library-association-announces-2017-youth-media-award-winners

Advertisements

Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its week-long summer institutes for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., this professional development opportunity provides educators of all disciplines with resources and strategies to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching.  Each session will focus on pedagogy, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge.

While practicing these teaching strategies, attendees will explore some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available in the Library’s collections.  They will also conduct research to identify primary sources and develop an activity related to their classroom content.

Five week-long sessions will be offered this summer:

General Focus – open to K-12 educators across all content areas:

  • June 19-23
  • June 26-30
  • July 10-14

Science, Technology, and Engineering Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology, or engineering, or collaborate with those who do:

  • July 17-21

WWI Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do:

  • July 31-August 4

The institute and course materials are provided at no cost. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due March 17 and require a letter of recommendation.

Learn more and apply here: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/

3 Apple Book Awards

Read now, vote in April! 3 Apples

Children in UPK – 2nd grade (ages 4-7), grades 3-6 (ages 8-12), and grades 7-12 (ages 13-18) have nominated their favorite book titles, creating a statewide ballot of the top 15 titles in each category. After reading or listening to at least three of the nominated titles, children and teens vote in April for their top choice. The winning three titles announced are announced to much fanfare in schools and public libraries across the state in May. Winning titles, and their author, are honored with the presentation of the 3 Apples Book Award.

3 Apples is a joint award from the two youth divisions of the New York Library Association: the Section of School Librarians (SSL) and the Youth Services Section (YSS).

2016 Assembly Standing Committee on Libraries and Education Technology; Funding Public Libraries

The purpose of this public hearing was to examine the 2016-2017 State Budget’s impact on the mission of New York State libraries in the 21st century. You can find the transcripts of testimonies at: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/testimony16/index.html

For the video recording of the testimonies go to: http://nystateassembly.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=8&clip_id=3956